Dialogic

Dialogic is the continual dialogue with other words.

The English terms dialogic and dialogism often refer to the concept used by the Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin in his work of literary theory, The Dialogic Imagination. Bakhtin contrasts the dialogic and the “monologic” work of literature.

This is not merely a matter of influence, for the dialogue extends in both directions, and the previous work of literature is as altered by the dialogue as the present one is. Though Bakhtin’s “dialogic” emanates from his work with colleagues in what we now call the “Bakhtin Circle” in years following 1918, his work was not known to the West or translated into English until the 1970s. For those only recently introduced to Bakhtin’s ideas but familiar with T.S.Eliot, his “dialogic” is consonant with Eliot’s ideas in “Tradition and the Individual Talent,” where Eliot holds that “the past should be altered by the present as much as the present is directed by the past”.[1] For Bakhtin, the influence can also occur at the level of the individual word or phrase as much as it does the work and even the oeuvre or collection of works. A German cannot use the word “fatherland” or the phrase “blood and soil” without (possibly unintentionally) also echoing (or, Bakhtin would say “refracting”) the meaning that those terms took on under Nazism. Every word has a history of usage to which it responds, and anticipates a future response.

When it comes to films/TV, dialogue’s the #1 thing I love listening to.

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